Text Size Text Size:

Tips for More Expressive Communication in Parkinson’s

[The Parkinson's Podcast™]

Tips for More Expressive Communication in Parkinson’s



tips-for-more-expressive-communication-in-parkinsons



Facial masking is an important symptom of Parkinson’s to pay attention to because it can limit the ability to communicate emotion. The good news is that people with Parkinson’s, their care partners and health care providers can do something about it.

In this episode, Kelsey talks to Professor Linda Tickle-Degnen about:

  • How to improve facial expression
  • What Parkinson’s care partners can do to create an environment that encourages more non-verbal expression
  • What people living with Parkinson’s can do to address their own facial masking
  • One of the easiest and most essential ways to help people with Parkinson’s overcome facial masking 
  • The importance of vocal exercised to improve facial masking
  • Mimicry and its role in our ability to empathize with other people
  • And much more!

Concepts Mentioned in this Podcast & Further Reading

Social Capital and the Value of Relationships in Parkinson’s
How to Reduce Social Isolation While Living Well with Parkinson’s
Facial Action Coding System
Sarah Gunnery
LSVT Big
LSVT Loud
Mirror Neurons
Deficits in the mimicry of facial expressions in Parkinson’s disease

Thanks for Listening!

To share your thoughts:

To help out the show:

  • Leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help, and we read each one.
  • Subscribe on iTunes.

Listen & Subscribe

Apple PodcastsStitcher | SoundCloud | Google Podcasts

Leave a Comment About This Blog Post Below
OR
Share Your Story Here »

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these <abbr title="HyperText Markup Language">HTML</abbr> tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*

*Your comment will be published on our website. If you have a private question or comment, please email contact@dpf.org.